Evaluate and Briefly Manage Patients: Ebola Assessment Hospitals

This module covers the basic concepts for evaluating and briefly managing a patient under investigation for Ebola. Although all U.S. healthcare facilities need to screen and promptly identify patients at risk for Ebola, the content of this module is primarily for Ebola Assessment Hospitals. These hospitals need to be capable of initial evaluation and care of these patients for up to 96 hours until Ebola testing is complete and a diagnosis of Ebola is confirmed or ruled out. Plans should be developed and practiced for safely transporting patients within the facility, designating and preparing a patient room and adjacent spaces to be used by staff, training staff on the use of personal protective equipment, laboratory safety, communications, and environmental infection control and waste management, among other topics. Public health authorities should be consulted promptly for additional information and guidance, and to facilitate transfer of the patient to an Ebola Treatment Center, if necessary.

Isolation of a Patient with Ebola Risk Factors and Symptoms

This module provides guidance to frontline and assessment hospitals for developing plans and procedures for safely implementing appropriate isolation precautions for a patient under investigation for Ebola. The module is focused on the emergency department, which is the likely first point of contact. Planning and adhering to these precautions will minimize the risk of infecting patients, staff, and visitors while these patients are evaluated. The module also outlines guidance for coordinating with public health authorities during the evaluation of patients under investigation for Ebola.

Considerations for Preparedness

Planning and preparedness are the keys to dealing effectively with threats that include infectious diseases caused by SARS and the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome or MERS, novel influenza viruses like H1N1, and Ebola. During outbreaks or epidemics of these emerging infectious diseases, healthcare facilities must carefully monitor the global situation as it evolves and conduct robust planning to promptly identify and safely manage a patient who may be infected and prevent further transmission. This module focuses on preparedness considerations for Ebola and how to engage a multi-disciplinary team to prepare your institution. Planning, preparedness, and practice will protect patients, visitors, and staff.

WHO: Survivors in Limbo

Sierra Leone has more than 2000 known Ebola survivors, who have been celebrated as heroes all over the country. But once back in the community, they face the harsh reality of stigmatization. As a young boy and orphan, Sherrie used to live with his uncle, until he was discharged from the Ebola treatment centre and he found that he wasn’t welcome back in his own home. Inspired by strength and courage, Sherrie and a few other survivors have created “the Rescue Team”, an association of Ebola survivors. The association already has more than 90 survivors from Port Loko district alone, the majority of whom are young adults.

 

Screening Patients for Ebola Risk Factors and Symptoms

Healthcare facilities that provide urgent care and emergency services are first points of contact for returning travelers who might have Ebola. This module provides guidance to emergency departments for developing plans and procedures for screening all patients for relevant travel history, risk factors for Ebola, and signs and symptoms that might be consistent with Ebola. Important concepts are outlined regarding safe, patient- and family-centered screening procedures that can appropriately diagnose and manage Ebola or other illnesses while ensuring respect for the patient and protection of the patient’s privacy throughout the screening process.

How to Safely Put on PPE, Selected Equipment: N95 and Gown

This video demonstrates the procedure described in CDC guidance for donning (i.e., putting on) personal protective equipment (PPE) for all healthcare providers entering the room of a patient hospitalized with known or suspected Ebola virus disease. It assumes the healthcare provider will be using an N95 and Gown.

How to Safely Put on PPE, Selected Equipment: PAPR and Coverall

This video demonstrates the procedure described in CDC guidance for donning (i.e., putting on) personal protective equipment (PPE) for all healthcare providers entering the room of a patient hospitalized with known or suspected Ebola virus disease. It assumes the healthcare provider will be using a PAPR and Coverall.

How to Safely Take off PPE, Selected Equipment: N95 and Coverall

This video demonstrates the procedure described in CDC guidance for doffing (i.e., removing) personal protective equipment (PPE) for all healthcare providers entering the room of a patient hospitalized with known or suspected Ebola virus disease. It assumes the healthcare provider is using an N95 and Coverall.

How to Serve as the Trained Observer (Entire Video)

This video discusses the roles and responsibilities of Trained Observers. A Trained Observer is a clinician, most likely an infection prevention professional, nurse, or physician, whose sole responsibility is to guide healthcare workers as they don (put on) and doff (take off) personal protective equipment (PPE) for caring for a suspect or confirmed Ebola patient. When acting as a Trained Observer you will not be delivering care directly to patients. Instead you will focus on ensuring the safety of healthcare workers.

Ebola: What You Need to Know

Information for service members about the West African Ebola virus disease outbreak.
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