Evaluate and Briefly Manage Patients: Ebola Assessment Hospitals

This module covers the basic concepts for evaluating and briefly managing a patient under investigation for Ebola. Although all U.S. healthcare facilities need to screen and promptly identify patients at risk for Ebola, the content of this module is primarily for Ebola Assessment Hospitals. These hospitals need to be capable of initial evaluation and care of these patients for up to 96 hours until Ebola testing is complete and a diagnosis of Ebola is confirmed or ruled out. Plans should be developed and practiced for safely transporting patients within the facility, designating and preparing a patient room and adjacent spaces to be used by staff, training staff on the use of personal protective equipment, laboratory safety, communications, and environmental infection control and waste management, among other topics. Public health authorities should be consulted promptly for additional information and guidance, and to facilitate transfer of the patient to an Ebola Treatment Center, if necessary.

Isolation of a Patient with Ebola Risk Factors and Symptoms

This module provides guidance to frontline and assessment hospitals for developing plans and procedures for safely implementing appropriate isolation precautions for a patient under investigation for Ebola. The module is focused on the emergency department, which is the likely first point of contact. Planning and adhering to these precautions will minimize the risk of infecting patients, staff, and visitors while these patients are evaluated. The module also outlines guidance for coordinating with public health authorities during the evaluation of patients under investigation for Ebola.

Screening Patients for Ebola Risk Factors and Symptoms

Healthcare facilities that provide urgent care and emergency services are first points of contact for returning travelers who might have Ebola. This module provides guidance to emergency departments for developing plans and procedures for screening all patients for relevant travel history, risk factors for Ebola, and signs and symptoms that might be consistent with Ebola. Important concepts are outlined regarding safe, patient- and family-centered screening procedures that can appropriately diagnose and manage Ebola or other illnesses while ensuring respect for the patient and protection of the patient’s privacy throughout the screening process.

Radio Spot on the Signs and Symptoms of Ebola

green-radioThis radio spot from the Liberia Ministry of Health and Social Welfare discusses what to do if you notice the signs and symptoms of Ebola.

What to do when you see signs and symptoms of Ebola

American Medical Association Ebola Resource Center

Ebola Resource CenterAmerican Medical Association Ebola Resource Center

Ebola Virus: How it Spreads and What it Does to You

Ebola How it SpreadsThe latest Ebola outbreak is the largest the world has ever seen, with more than 4,500 confirmed deaths in west Africa. Patients are often killed not by the virus itself, but by the overreaction of their immune system to the infection. Here, Ian Sample explains how Ebola is transmitted, the organs it disrupts, the symptoms of infection and the chances of survival.

Ebola Virus: How it Spreads and What it Does to You

BBC News – Ebola in 60 Seconds

Ebola in 60 SecThe Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the deadliest occurrence of the disease since its discovery in 1976.
BBC News explains why the disease is so dangerous – in 60 seconds.

In 60 seconds: What is Ebola?

UpToDate

UpToDate clinical decision support

UpToDateWolters Kluwer Health has granted full, free access to all of its UpToDate clinical decision support resource in the West African countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Anyone visiting www.uptodate.com with an IP address originating in these countries will have immediate free access to UpToDate.

International SOS poster translated into Gusilay (Senegalese language)

gusilayposterPoster by International SOS translated, with permission, into Gusilay, a language spoken in southern Senegal.

International SOS poster translated into Manjaku (Senegalese language)

manjakuposterPoster by International SOS translated, with permission, into Manjaku, a language spoken in southern Senegal.